Hijab means “Shield” not “Feminism” D:

I wear the hijab. No one has to tell me to. No man told me to (I will beat the men up who thinks I will cover up for him). But God told me to and I like to be devout.

I don’t believe in forcing women to wear the hijab because I find that offensive to not to respect different choices.

I don’t think Hijab has anything to do with Feminism, as a lot of Hijabi-feminists say. They say it makes them not be seen as property. But why should we see any women, dressed however they want, as property? I WANT a world where women are seen as equals no matter what they wear. Isn’t this contradictory to feminism? But the only reason why I sometimes don’t approve of certain women (Miley Cyrus and Kim K, yes I am looking your ways) is because I think it poses a threat to other women because of all the horny nuts out there, but not because I don’t believe in freedom of expression.

The word hijab means “shield”. And that is EXACTLY what it is to me. To shield myself from bad men and thank goodness nothing serious has happened to me so far and I thank the hijab for that. Hijab is carefulness to me.

If a woman says it is her choice, that’s different from what other women deal with where they aren’t given any choices in countries. Why is that mentioned? That is a whole other political topic. And not all hijabi-feminists think alike.I don’t agree with women who says Hijab is feminist. I think hijab is a NEUTRAL, INNOCENT entity for protection, I don’t understand why people feel the need to attach extra things to it like it makes you less of a property.

I am hijabi and I am a feminist. If you don’t think that’s possible..well….YOU don’t think that’s possible, nothing more.

Inspired by the Freshly Pressed article: Is the hijab a feminist statement?

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31 thoughts on “Hijab means “Shield” not “Feminism” D:

  1. Darshith Badiyani says:

    We all have our choices and others have their judgement. The best thing is to do your own business and not ponder into others’. And by doing that, the judgement part can be minimal or neutral. I hope, we all become equals and remain as such. You wrote your heart out and Cheers for that ๐Ÿ™‚

      • hbhatnagar says:

        That’s why I wondered why you posted it. I can see you’re very much in support of it and I don’t find a problem with that, but are you ready for a s***-storm that may fall if some idiot latches on to it? And I know you know it gets ugly. Well, either way, you’ll have my support in flaming anyone who does that! ๐Ÿ™‚

      • Mon (is a Girl's Name) says:

        Yeah I know.

        But if someone posts something rudely though (or sends out a sh*t-storm, LOL) I will delete those comments ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Some people disagree with me here already but no one is being rude to me about it.

        :’) Thank you so much! ๐Ÿ™‚ I am glad I have you support, this truly warmed my heart โค โค ๐Ÿ™‚ :') ๐Ÿ™‚ โค ๐Ÿ˜€

  2. blanked15 says:

    I really get what you are saying here. I believe that women should always be able to choose what they wear and shouldn’t be forced to change by anyone. However the only problem I have with Hijab’s is that I don’t believe that you should wear them because you feel the need to shield yourself in order to feel safe. Women should feel safe without wearing one. I think the feminist part comes in as a way to say
    “I have the right to exist and walk around without fear of being sexualised by men.” If both men and women had equal rights then it wouldn’t be necessary to wear one in order to feel safe. By wearing one to feel safe from men you are allowing men to dictate what you wear because they determine your level of safety when your out.
    And I’m not quite sure I understand why Miley poses a threat to other women?

    • Mon (is a Girl's Name) says:

      I want a world too where I feel safe without needing one. But there will always be nut-jobs, there is someone every moment who is being molested and I don’t want to be in that statistic. The country I come from makes me appreciate it more because a lot of the men here are nuts. If I lived in a developed country where the economical conditions were good and few, less sleazy men with nothing to do hung around outside, I wouldn’t understand the value of hijab. I want to stay safe more than care about what men think.

      I am sure if I came from such a country, I wouldn’t feel the need to even wear it. But I see how it protects me here. And right now even if I go to a developed country where I am safer, I would still wear it because I understood it’s value all these years and how I was “shielded”. I grew a love for it and also, it visually tells people about my religion too, I kind of take a little pride in that โค

      And honestly, at the rate the world is developing, I don't think industrial serialization will ever stop and this problem of women's safety in even developed countries ever solved :/

      • Mon (is a Girl's Name) says:

        Oh yeah, about Miley. I believe in freedom of expression but I don’t think it should be done if it makes “horny men crazy”. I think such things increase the rate of molestation. I know the core issue is bringing up of these men and that they should control urges, but really, is any of them trying? There’s no threat to not being turned on and they will keep being this way but I might have a *possible* threat coming if any men feels this way. (I said “possible”!)

        Some people might think I am being over-cautious but really it’s just me following the ways of my religion, understanding the wisdom in the ways of my book and forging my own path. No one is telling me to dress this way. I learnt about this way and I choose this way.

  3. shubhada says:

    Hm.. Fair enough..

    But I’m kinda curious.. Don’t you feel hot wearing the hijab? One, it’s black, which absorbs heat; two, there’s a dress under the hijab and three we live in a tropical region..

    And also, don’t you get bored wearing the same colour everyday? ๐Ÿ˜›

    • Mon (is a Girl's Name) says:

      It doesn’t have to be black ๐Ÿ˜ฎ I don’t know why so many are obsessed with the color black ๐Ÿ˜ฎ I wear light-colored clothing.

      Hijab means “shield”- it is to cover yourself up modestly (modestly in terms of the rules of my religion, that is. For religion I have one opinion and for general people, I think as long as they don’t show any “prominent” features, if you know what I mean). Only men are not allowed to wear a certain color because it is striking to the eye and that color is “red”.

      I WOULD BE bored if I wore the same color everyday ๐Ÿ˜„ But I don’t ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ™‚

      And I am fine with the hijab as long as I am not out in “too sunny” conditions or without a fan in the room ๐Ÿ˜„

      • shubhada says:

        Oh okay, I got confused. I thought hijab is the black gown like thing that Muslims wear, to cover their whole body… They normally wear it over their usual dress.

      • shubhada says:

        Yeah, I meant burqa! Lol, I’m sorry, I don’t have much knowledge about the terms!

        I’ve always wanted to ask the two things in previous comment to the women who wear burqa, but I never got the chance to!

  4. rachecervantes217 says:

    Having been to Saudi Arabia, I was under the impression that the hijab is a Muslim article of clothing, meant to cover the face, as a way to keep men from trying to go after you. It’s not used to protect men from temptation, but rather protect women who could easily fall into temptation. Despite there being a lot of women in Saudi, there are a lot of men who act as if they have never seen one before. It’s really weird. When I was talking with one of my friends, he mentioned that an Arab waiter commented about me being pretty. I don’t have a problem with that, but he behaved as if he had been deprived from the other sex for several years.

    • Mon (is a Girl's Name) says:

      How others think or act is not going to change the meaning of the word “Hijab” for me, which originally means “Shield” anyway. It’s obvious that men who don’t follow the “lower your gaze” rule at women will publicly act like they are deprived.

      Islam doesn’t command to be deprived from having benefits from the opposite sex- we have marriage for that.

      And having been in a country where I have eyes staring down at me while I am *still* wearing the hijab makes me appreciate it even more.

      I respect your opinion that it might seem weird when men act like you’re the only woman there, but it’s a condition of shielding myself and I would like this very much in my own country for a change :/

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